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Should salary negotiations be a laughing matter?

Thanks to the anchoring effect, joking about how much you’d like to earn could win you more money in your next job, according to new research.
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Negotiating group agreements that last

Three recent political negotiations illustrate both the challenges and the rewards of generating consensus among parties with very different views.
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How can women gain ground in the workplace?

Deborah Kolb, the Deloitte Ellen Gabriel Professor for Women in Leadership (Emerita) at Simmons College, shares strategies that women can use to overcome pay and promotion gaps at work.
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Got issues? In negotiation, the more, the better

Adding multiple issues to the discussion can complicate a negotiation—but that’s not a bad thing.
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Create value by collaborating with competitors

To get ahead in business, it sometimes pays to team up with your biggest rivals.
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Learning more from our negotiations

“Negotiation teachers need to show people a concept in two different situations so that they can begin to apply it to their own situation, or teachers need to demonstrate a method in a way that is illustrated but not fully articulated, as in a video.”
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Before negotiating via video, consider the hidden pitfalls

Negotiating via Skype and other videoconferencing tools is an effortless way to bring parties together, but there are potential drawbacks that you need to consider.
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Negotiating seamless leadership transitions

The drama surrounding the departure of Uber’s longtime CEO points to the value of negotiating leadership shifts in a way that minimizes disruption.
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The promise of web-based negotiation

Harvard Business School professor Max H. Bazerman describes how web-based negotiations could increase efficiency and trust in many realms.
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Obama walks the line between criticism and provocation

When Donald Trump visited the White House soon after being elected president last November, then-president Barack Obama urged him to keep in place the Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program that Obama instituted through executive fiat in 2012. The program shields from deportation about 800,000 young people who were brought to the United States illegally and grants them work permits. Obama warned Trump that he would publicly berate him if he revoked DACA, according to Politico.
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