Negotiation in the News

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How Congress got to “yes” on new banking rules

It’s hardly news that in the U.S. Congress, bipartisan dealmaking has been virtually nonexistent for years. That’s why it was newsworthy when Democrats and Republicans came together to negotiate changes to the Dodd-Frank law.
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Order in the Senate, with the help of a simple tool

With the government on the brink of a shutdown on January 19 due to the Senate’s inability to agree on a spending bill, about 17 centrist Democratic and Republican senators crowded into the Capitol Hill office of Republican senator Susan Collins of Maine. But their common goal—negotiating a deal to end the shutdown—was reportedly thwarted by a cacophony of voices.
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Will Amazon’s winner be cursed?

The bidding frenzy stirred up by Amazon’s contest for its second headquarters raises the question of whether the winner will overpay for the prize.
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Making group decisions when values are at stake

President Trump’s controversial remarks have left business groups struggling to find a unified way to respond.
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Adapting the BATNA strategy across cultures

The BATNA (best alternative to a negotiated agreement) concept, popularized by Roger Fisher, William Ury, and Bruce Patton in their book Getting to Yes (Penguin Books, second edition, 1991), has been disseminated all over the world and doubtless helped thousands avoid settling for less than what they want in negotiations. When you have identified your BATNA, you can compare it to the offers you receive, turn down subpar offers, and exercise your BATNA instead.
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Before building a coalition, consider the consequences

This past July, the News Media Alliance (NMA), a trade association of approximately 2,000 U.S. and Canadian news organizations, announced that it was planning to ask Congress for a limited antitrust exemption to allow its members to negotiate collectively with Google and Facebook regarding digital advertising. With consumers increasingly accessing their news through web platforms, print and online newspapers have seen their ad revenues plummet, while Google’s and Facebook’s have soared.
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The Amazon–Whole Foods merger: Scoring a table for two in a crowded field

Imagine you’re competing with multiple parties to secure a coveted resource, such as your dream house, a cool invention, or a talented new hire. How might you stand out from the pack and win the prize? Maybe by finding a way to preempt the competition. That’s what Amazon recently did in its $13.4 billion acquisition of upscale grocer Whole Foods.
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For Hollywood writers, a heavily negotiated new script

In its negotiations for a new contract with entertainment companies this spring, the Writers Guild of America delivered at the bargaining table what many film and TV viewers crave onscreen: plenty of suspense and a hard-won, if imperfect, victory.
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When Two Deals are Better than One

When you have multiple negotiations to conduct with one or more partners, should you combine them into one big deal? In negotiations for the sale of new books by Barack and Michelle Obama, the answer was an emphatic yes.
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Negotiating Controversial Issues

When you’re trying to negotiate a hot-button issue, what’s the best approach to take? That was the question facing U.S. president Donald Trump as he and his administration attempted to convince the government of Mexico to fund a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, in addition to negotiating other matters of concern to both governments.
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