Negotiation Research

When criticism helps—and hurts—brainstorming

Negative feedback is often viewed as a creativity killer in negotiations, but new research finds the opposite effect under certain conditions.
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When offers are more appealing than requests

In 2015, the government of Greece approached the European Union regarding a new bailout package by requesting a six-month loan extension. The request was rejected within five hours. Four months later, Greece offered new budget proposals in return for an extended bailout package. This time, the proposal led to agreement.
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To build rapport, be a (subtle) copycat

While being deliberately mimicked for laughs is annoying (ask any parent of young kids), people actually tend to like those who subtly mimic them better than those who don’t, researchers have found.
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Reducing gender bias in hiring negotiations

No matter how strong their credentials or negotiating skills, women are less likely than men to be chosen for jobs historically held by men, such as positions in leadership, science, and engineering, past research shows. In a new study, University of Vienna assistant professor Steffen Keck and National University of Singapore visiting assistant professor Wenjie Tang found the comparisons that hiring personnel make among final candidates for a position may play a role in such discrimination.
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In price negotiations, make them happy with less

In a new study, Singapore Management University professor Michael Schaerer and his colleagues identify a promising way to improve the other party’s satisfaction even when you’re the one who claims the most value.
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Not taking no for an answer

Have you ever done business with a negotiator who just won’t stop asking for more? A sense of entitlement may be to blame, Lukas Neville of the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, and Glenda M. Fisk of Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, found in a new study.
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When men are—and aren’t—more likely to negotiate than women

Women can be less likely than men to initiate negotiations, a meta-analysis of existing studies on the topic concluded last year.
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Too guilty to compete?

Our emotions—including anger, sadness, happiness, and disgust—influence our negotiation behavior in systematic ways, research shows. In a new study, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev researcher Uriel Haran is the first to examine whether feeling guilty affects our competitive drive.
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Have you tried a hypothetical question?

In a new paper published in the Negotiation Journal, University of Amsterdam researchers Diyan Nikolov Grigorov and A. Francisca Snoeck Henkemans suggest that a particular kind of question may be especially useful when delivering offers and proposals in negotiation: hypothetical ones.
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Bringing mediation into the technological era

Laptops, smartphones, databases, and project-management software have become common tools of the negotiation trade. Meanwhile, even as online dispute resolution has risen in popularity, the traditional practice of inperson mediation remains a largely technology-free zone, with smartphones often turned off and tucked away.
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