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Why displays of anger can backfire

When negotiators get angry, their counterparts often snap to attention, research shows. We tend to perceive negotiators who appear angry as hard bargainers, and thus make lower demands of them and offer them higher concessions than when dealing with happy opponents, University of Amsterdam professor Gerben A. Van Kleef has found in his research.

In email negotiations, when they’re happy, do you know it?

Negotiators’ expressions of emotion offer critical feedback about their preferences, offers, fears, and other information, yet emotions can be notoriously difficult to interpret accurately.

Keeping advisers on our side

Before and during a negotiation, we often seek advice from others about whom to approach, what to offer, what to accept, and how to navigate an unfamiliar process. Whether our advisers are experienced agents negotiating on our behalf or friends sharing their personal experience, we weigh their advice and decide whether or not to follow it.

When all we can see is red

The ability to take another person’s perspective is a valuable negotiation skill. Perspective taking enhances the discovery of joint gains in negotiation, makes groups more effective, reduces stereotypical thinking, and aids in conflict resolution, to name just a few benefits.

Inoculate yourself against auction fever

Those who participate regularly in auctions have likely observed the phenomenon of “auction fever” firsthand—or caught the fever themselves.

Recovering from adverse events in negotiation

When setbacks arise in negotiation—from a take-it-or-leave-it offer to a walkout to an unexpected economic downturn—we’re faced with several choices.

Are women more ethical negotiators than men—and if so, why?

Men tend to claim more resources than women in negotiation, research shows. Why?

Should you brandish your BATNA?

When and how to reveal what you’ll do if you can’t reach a deal.

In job interviews, is it better to be excited or calm?

When interviewing for a job, you might wonder whether you’ll be viewed more favorably if you appear excited and enthusiastic or if you seem calm and collected. There’s certainly an argument to be made for either choice.

Why screen size matters in negotiation

Do you sometimes negotiate on your smartphone? Before tapping out your next offer, you might want to switch to a video chat on your laptop, the results of a new study led by Rutgers Business School professor Terri R. Kurtzberg suggest.

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