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Inoculate yourself against auction fever

Those who participate regularly in auctions have likely observed the phenomenon of “auction fever” firsthand—or caught the fever themselves.

Recovering from adverse events in negotiation

When setbacks arise in negotiation—from a take-it-or-leave-it offer to a walkout to an unexpected economic downturn—we’re faced with several choices.

Are women more ethical negotiators than men—and if so, why?

Men tend to claim more resources than women in negotiation, research shows. Why?

Should you brandish your BATNA?

When and how to reveal what you’ll do if you can’t reach a deal.

In job interviews, is it better to be excited or calm?

When interviewing for a job, you might wonder whether you’ll be viewed more favorably if you appear excited and enthusiastic or if you seem calm and collected. There’s certainly an argument to be made for either choice.

Why screen size matters in negotiation

Do you sometimes negotiate on your smartphone? Before tapping out your next offer, you might want to switch to a video chat on your laptop, the results of a new study led by Rutgers Business School professor Terri R. Kurtzberg suggest.

Scaling back the urge to merge

Organizations considering a merger or acquisition are often cautioned that the majority of such deals fail to live up to expectations and, indeed, end up as money-losing ventures.

Promoting cooperation between teams

When a team negotiates on behalf of an organization, it can often achieve more than an individual would thanks to the team’s cumulative knowledge and experience. Yet team negotiations can create new problems.

To curb dishonesty in negotiation, confront “paranoid pessimism”

Business negotiators often worry about being deceived, and understandably so. The potential for being lied to or swindled can be high in negotiation, given that our counterparts typically have access to information about preferences, alternatives, product quality, and so on, that we lack. Yet research shows that negotiators often behave honestly even when doing so costs them money.

“Twinning” at negotiation: Using similarities to measure our differences

We might hope that when we adopt negotiation best practices—such as spending lots of time preparing and asking questions at the table—we would achieve consistently strong results in our negotiations. Yet as most of us have experienced, our outcomes and personal satisfaction can vary a great deal from one negotiation to the next. Why?

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