Negotiation Research

The pitfalls of put-downs: When “trash talk” backfires

In a survey of office workers from Fortune 500 companies, Georgetown University professor Jeremy Yip and his colleagues found that 61% recalled hearing or engaging in boastful or insulting comments at work within the prior three months.
Read the full article →

French impressions

The French are well known for their sartorial style, but what about their negotiating style?
Read the full article →

When being yourself gets you the job

“Just be yourself”: It’s probably the most common advice given to job interviewees. But research suggests most people don’t follow the old cliché.
Read the full article →

When women “lean out” of leadership roles

Women are underrepresented in leadership roles in the workplace, holding only about 16% of executive positions in Fortune 500 companies. Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg and others have urged women to “lean in” by competing for high-level managerial jobs and negotiating for better pay and greater responsibility. Yet substantial evidence shows that many women who try to lean in face biased hiring and promotion processes that favor men.
Read the full article →

When anger helps and hurts at the office

Most of us dread displays of anger at work, whether we’re the aggrieved party, the target of someone’s wrath, or just an innocent bystander. But anger can have benefits in the workplace when expressed constructively, airing differences that need to be addressed, improving relationships, and bringing injustice and mistreatment to light.
Read the full article →

When first offers fail

In negotiation, the party who makes the first offer often gets the lion’s share of the value. That can be due to the anchoring effect, or the tendency for the first offer to “anchor” the bargaining that follows in its direction, even if the offer recipient thinks the offer is out of line. Yet plenty of times, the person making the first offer fails to capture most of the value in a negotiation. Why might that be the case?
Read the full article →

When Women Negotiate More Ethically Than Men

In a new study published in Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Jessica A. Kennedy (Vanderbilt University), Laura J. Kray (University of California, Berkeley), and Gillian Ku (London Business School) looked closely at possible gender differences in negotiator ethics and found nuanced results.
Read the full article →

When Powerful Negotiators Cut Corners

When negotiators know they’re more powerful, they tend to believe that a fair agreement should reflect their power advantage, while weaker negotiators tend to favor equal outcomes.
Read the full article →

Harness the Power of Popular Opinion

Our knowledge of cognitive biases can help us design systems that steer people toward choices that would benefit them and society at large, such as saving more for retirement, making healthier food choices, and donating their organs after death.
Read the full article →

Looking for a Favor? Ask in Person

Imagine that you are about to ask someone for something. Maybe you’re trying to initiate a negotiation by asking a potential customer to listen to your proposal. Or you could be making a one-off request, such as asking a neighbor to quiet his barking dog. How likely do you think it is that the other party will comply with your request?
Read the full article →